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Author Topic: National Zoo Panda Cam  (Read 82322 times)
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hermit
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« Reply #810 on: December 16, 2016, 10:32:46 PM »

I hope his problem won't be a recurring thing.  I know they're taking good care of him.
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hermit
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« Reply #811 on: December 17, 2016, 11:54:03 AM »


Bei Bei Post Surgery
As Bei Bei recovers from surgery, his diet is slowly returning to normal but he still needs to wait until he can eat bamboo. However, he continues to gain weight, and has crossed the 100-pound (45 kilos) mark. While Bei Bei continues his recovery, we have adjusted Mei Xiang’s schedule to ensure that she still gets an adequate amount of bamboo each day. During the day, Bei Bei happily eats and rests inside while Mei Xiang is fed outside in the yard.

Prior to Bei Bei's surgery, our normal panda routine was to do a large bamboo feeding at the end of the day to see them through the night. Now, with Bei Bei’s diet restrictions we can’t put any bamboo in the indoor enclosures, and overnight is too long to leave Mei Xiang without bamboo. The solution is to feed Mei Xiang her bamboo outdoors only, and to lengthen her day, so she is only without access to bamboo for a few hours.

Originally, keepers were staying round the clock, both to monitor Bei Bei and to provide bamboo feedings for Mei Xiang. As the days passed and Bei Bei no longer required round the clock care, we realized that Mei Xiang really wasn’t interested in eating much bamboo overnight anyway. So, we gradually began increasing the time between the last feeding of the evening and the first of the morning until we arrived at the current schedule, which seems to be working well for everyone. We provide Mei Xiang at least five outdoor bamboo feedings each day while Bei Bei rests indoors.

This is the time in Bei Bei’s development where he continues to spend more and more time apart from his mom, so both are unfazed by this schedule. This is also the time of year where the temperatures drop, but the pandas are loving it!  This is panda weather, and they are well equipped to deal with the cooler temperatures.

Both Bao Bao and Tian Tian are paying little attention to the schedule changes going on around them.  They continue to be on their own eating, sleeping and playing schedules.


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nightengale
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« Reply #812 on: December 26, 2016, 07:15:46 PM »

Bei Bei looks chipper in that picture! Thanks hermit!  

.... today's Bei Bei video ....

Bei Bei 12/26/16
Published on Dec 26, 2016
   by Sandy G
Bei Bei. Recorded at the Smithsonian National Zoo on December 26, 2016.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOubnVEmtbY





     
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~Chris~ 
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world ~ John Muir
 
hermit
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« Reply #813 on: December 26, 2016, 10:55:04 PM »

He is so sweet.  love  Thanks, Chrisflower
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nightengale
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« Reply #814 on: December 29, 2016, 07:59:13 PM »

Looks like Bao Bao took some 'panda pepper-uppers'!

So many somersaults! .... makes me dizzy!  

Bao Bao 12/28/16
Published on Dec 28, 2016
   by SandyG
Bao Bao. Recorded at the Smithsonian National Zoo on December 28, 2016.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5qjeJqz8OI







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~Chris~ 
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world ~ John Muir
 
hermit
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« Reply #815 on: December 30, 2016, 07:54:19 PM »

What a great video!  Thanks, Chris.
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nightengale
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« Reply #816 on: December 31, 2016, 08:35:25 PM »

She has a lot of energy, huh hermit?!   mhihi

Happy New Year!

       
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~Chris~ 
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world ~ John Muir
 
hermit
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« Reply #817 on: January 10, 2017, 03:05:29 PM »

Jan. 10
This update was written by giant panda keeper Nicole MacCorkle.

Bei Bei is continuing to recover well from his major surgery, and he started eating small amounts of bamboo again a few weeks ago. He now gets several meals of leaf eater biscuits, sweet potatoes and apples, and several bamboo feedings every day. He eagerly consumes all his food—much as he has since he was born. As part of his recovery process, we are still closely monitoring all of his food consumption, not just bamboo. And as a result, he is staying inside where we can more closely control and regulate what he eats. He will start going outside again soon, but we need to be sure that he doesn’t nibble on too much grass, leaves or other vegetation when he does.

Until Bei Bei is cleared to go outside by our veterinarians and nutritionists, he will spend his time inside the panda house—a place he is very familiar and comfortable with and has been spending time in since he was born. In addition to his feedings, he also is given several enrichment (play) items every day. He is a very flexible animal, and has adjusted remarkably well to all of the changes in his routine.

One of the ways we monitor Bei Bei is by his fecal production; it helps us determine how his gastrointestinal tract is recovering. So far, his stools have been normal and look like miniature versions of Mei Xiang’s. His weight is also a good indicator of how he’s feeling. He now weighs 109 pounds; he’s gained more than 10 pounds since his surgery—all good signs for a growing bear.

Now that Bei Bei is 16 months old and weighs more than 100 pounds, Mei Xiang is weaning him, which is completely normal.  She does not always allow him to nurse as much as he might like, but he does not depend on her for his nutrition any longer. We noticed in the first few days following surgery that Mei Xiang seemed to be gentler with Bei Bei and even allowed him to nurse more than normal, but their relationship has returned to what it was before his surgery.

When Bei Bei is ready to go outside again, we’ll be sure to let everyone know. In the meantime, you can visit him inside the panda house.
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nightengale
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« Reply #818 on: January 21, 2017, 12:29:30 PM »

Nursing can be such a comfort for little ones .... little pandas .... and little people  

A new Bao Bao video ....





Bao Bao 1/18/17
Published on Jan 18, 2017
   by Sandy G
Bao Bao. Recorded at the Smithsonian National Zoo on January 18, 2017.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXvShfvYGec

....  such a beautifully silly girl  heart0
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~Chris~ 
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world ~ John Muir
 
hermit
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« Reply #819 on: January 22, 2017, 04:00:00 AM »

How I wish that pandas born here, could stay here.
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hermit
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« Reply #820 on: February 16, 2017, 10:42:08 PM »

February 16

In just a few days, Bao Bao will board a plane with two of her caretakers-- keeper Martie Dearie and veterinarian Katharine Hope-- by her side. After traveling halfway around the world, Washington, D.C.'s first female panda cub will arrive in China. There, she will have an opportunity to do something truly spectacular: contribute to her species' survival.


Bao Bao leaves on Tuesday.  crying

Feb. 16, 2017

On Aug. 23, 2013, a pink, squiggly giant panda cub named Bao Bao arrived at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. She announced her presence with a hearty squeal to the delight of Panda Cam viewers around the world. Among those sharing the joy of the Zoo’s conservation success were the animal care staff who had helped make Bao Bao’s birth possible. As keepers prepare to say bye-bye to Bao Bao, they are sharing some of their favorite memories of the playful and inquisitive cub who made history.

“Bao Bao was the first giant panda cub I worked with, and I’ve learned so much watching her grow from the size of a butter stick to the 200-pound bear she is today. Weighing and measuring a squirmy—and noisy—panda cub is an experience like no other. She’s much easier to weigh now!” – Jenny Spotten, Asia Trail keeper

“At the public reopening of the Panda House following Bao Bao’s birth, she was amazing—as always. But, I especially enjoyed watching the visitors react to her. The looks on their faces made all of our hard work and long hours seem easier. I saw firsthand how much our pandas touch people’s lives and how much happiness they bring to everyone.” – Nicole MacCorkle, giant panda keeper

“My favorite Bao Bao moment was the first time she experienced a snow storm. Watching her roll down the hill holding a log had me laughing out loud!” – Marty Dearie, giant panda keeper

“Bao Bao often climbs the trees in her yard and peeks over the fence to see what keepers are doing. She seems to want to know what’s going on!” – Laurie Thompson, assistant curator of giant pandas

“On Christmas Eve in 2014, Bao Bao climbed a tree and did not come down when called, so I stayed late. I expected that I would have to stay well into the next day, but just before midnight Bao Bao made her way down the tree and into the Panda House. It was our own Christmas miracle.” – Shellie Pick, Asia Trail keeper

“Bao Bao is so active and silly when no one is watching. In the middle of the night, she plays wildly—jumping up and down, running around, throwing her toys and dragging bamboo around her enclosure. It’s a whole other side of her that she seems to keep to herself.” – Stacey Tabellario, Asia Trail keeper
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nightengale
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« Reply #821 on: February 21, 2017, 10:23:25 PM »

'Bye Bye Bao Bao"

https://www.yahoo.com/news/bye-bye-bao-bao-beloved-220600890.html

 crying
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~Chris~ 
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world ~ John Muir
 
hermit
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« Reply #822 on: February 22, 2017, 03:42:15 AM »

So sad.  crying
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hermit
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« Reply #823 on: February 22, 2017, 07:19:48 PM »

Bao Bao Arrives in China
Feb. 22, 2017

Bao Bao, her keeper Marty Dearie and Dr. Katharine Hope landed at China’s Chengdu Shuangliu International Airport around 6:59 p.m. CST after a 16-hour direct flight aboard the “FedEx Panda Express,” a custom-decaled 777F aircraft. Bao Bao ate, drank and slept normally during the smooth flight.

“Bao Bao was a real champion during the flight. All the weeks of training and preparation served her really well,” said Marty. “She’s in excellent hands now and I’m glad I get to transition with our Chinese partners and have my ‘goodbye’ in a couple days.”

Upon arrival in Chengdu, Bao Bao’s new keepers from the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda drove her to Dujiangyan Panda Base where she will stay in quarantine for approximately 30 days. Marty will remain with Bao Bao for three days while she acclimates to her new home. It is not confirmed if Bao Bao will remain at Dujiangyan after the quarantine period has ended. She will enter the giant panda breeding program when she reaches sexual maturity between 5 and 6 years old.

Back in Washington, D.C. at the Zoo, the panda team is looking to the future. Bei Bei is already a year-and-a-half old! Giant panda cubs usually separate from their mothers around 18 months old, and Bei Bei is becoming more independent and confident every day. He is fully recovered from his emergency surgery this winter and is growing like a weed. Several months ago, we started seeing the first signs that Mei Xiang was preparing to wean him. She is much less accommodating for nursing sessions, which is normal because Bei Bei has not been nutritionally dependent on Mei Xiang for several months. Any nursing sessions he has are for comfort rather than food. He is 131 pounds now (much larger than Bao Bao was when she weaned from Mei Xiang) and eats nearly 90 pounds of bamboo (along with Mei Xiang) per day, 1/3 pound of apples, 1 pound of biscuits, and a little more than half of a pound of sweet potatoes every day.

Earlier today, keepers gave Mei Xiang and Bei Bei their first opportunity to spend time together in Yard 3, Bao Bao’s old yard. If Bei Bei becomes familiar with this yard while he is still living with Mei Xiang, then his transition to living on his own will be much smoother. Everything went well this morning.

Tian Tian also got a change of scenery today! He has access to both his regular yard and Mei Xiang’s yard which made him a very happy panda. He investigated all of Mei Xiang’s scent marks and did lots of scent-anointing (rubbing her scent all over his head). He appeared to be in a very playful mood acting more like a cub than a 19-year-old bear. He tumbled around the yard and even climbed a few trees!
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hermit
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« Reply #824 on: March 04, 2017, 03:02:22 PM »

Bei Bei is Weaning
Mar. 04, 2017

People who have been watching the panda cams have seen some big changes over the last few weeks. Bei Bei is weaning from Mei Xiang. We have heard from many worried panda fans as Mei Xiang and Bei Bei go through their weaning process. This is the third panda cub we have weaned at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo. We are monitoring Mei Xiang and Bei Bei’s behaviors closely. Pandas are solitary animals, and cubs generally separate from their mothers around 18 months old. This is a natural process. Bei Bei is a resilient bear who is learning to be independent, and the animal care team is supporting his efforts. This is a process, but there is professional and dedicated staff monitoring our pandas and attending to their needs. The animal keepers provide all our pandas with lots of attention, including training sessions and enrichment, timed throughout the day.  

Just like with any new big adjustment, there have been some stressful moments, but Bei Bei and Mei Xiang are adjusting. The timeline for Bei Bei’s weaning mirrored Bao Bao’s, which is the same model other institutions have successfully used with their cubs. The ambiguity of drawn-out separation can actually make things more stressful for moms and cubs. A clean, quick separation has proven to be the easiest way for both individuals to adjust. Prolonging the process (repeatedly letting them spend time together, then separating them) doesn’t eliminate any anxious behaviors; it just draws them out.

Even though Bei Bei is living separately from Mei Xiang, and has always lived separately from Tian Tian, he is still very aware of both of them. Yard 3 (the yard he lives in now) offers some good viewing opportunities to yard 2 (Mei Xiang’s yard), and just like his older siblings before him, Bei Bei is making use of them. All of our pandas are aware of what the others are doing—they live in close proximity, and can see, hear and smell each other. Bei Bei is likely sometimes trying to climb to see Mei Xiang. It is ok, because we know from our own experiences with his older siblings, as well as from the other zoos that have weaned pandas, that this disruption is short-lived, and that all will be fine soon. Bei Bei is already adjusting, and has been exploring and making use of the features of his new enclosures, such as napping in his indoor hammock.

We are already seeing behaviors in Tian Tian and Mei Xiang that show they are preparing for the upcoming breeding season. Mei Xiang has been pacing, which may be related to weaning Bei Bei, but it is also a common pre-estrus behavior. In conjunction with the pacing, we heard her vocalizing to Tian Tian on Friday. Again, we can’t speculate what her motive is, but it seems she is reacting to Tian Tian at least as much as she is to Bei Bei recently. These are same behaviors we saw with her previous two cubs, and past experiences have shown us that the disruption is short lived.

For 45 years, our passionate and professional animal care staff and scientists have worked to care for, study and help save this charismatic species. Our work would not be possible without your support. Thank you for reaching out with your questions on Mei Xiang and Bei Bei!

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