January 22, 2018, 03:15:31 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: 2014 - First BRI Maine Eagles egg laid March 16, 2014. Second egg laid March 19, 2014.
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages:  1 ... 149 150 [151] 152   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Zoo Atlanta Panda Cam  (Read 175278 times)
0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2250 on: November 14, 2017, 10:34:44 PM »

November 13, 2017
Giant pandas sleep in the most ridiculous positions — whether it is on their backs with one paw extended, or resting their heads on logs. Somehow they make every position look comfortable. We like to say that what looks uncomfortable for a human, is the best sleeping position for a giant panda. The cubs are especially fond of being curled in a ball with their hind legs by their faces. It makes no sense to me how their bodies bend like that but hey, they don’t seem to mind.
Shauna
Keeper II, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2251 on: November 15, 2017, 08:35:06 PM »

November 15, 2017
Many of you know that we don’t share spaces with our adult giant pandas, but we still frequently get questions regarding sharing the same space with the cubs. When I say “share a space,” I mean that there is no protective barrier between a keeper and an animal. That would be referred to as a free-contact animal (think along the lines of our petting zoo animals). Protected contact means that there is always a barrier between a keeper and an animal, for both human and animal safety.

Ya Lun and Xi Lun, no matter how fluffy and cute they appear, are still bears. Bears are built as carnivores despite their bamboo diet, and have all of the traits that come along with that distinction. Even with youngsters, there are claws, teeth, and more strength than you would expect from something so small. Giant pandas have one of the highest bite forces of any terrestrial carnivore, and the cubs, while not fully grown, are still capable of biting. Now that Ya Lun and Xi Lun are 14 months old, we no longer handle them for weighing or for any other reason. At their age, they tend to sleep most of the day and are not yet shifting reliably, although we still need to provide bamboo and habitat maintenance for them. As with all of the previous cubs, at this stage in their development, per our care protocols we do not enter the same space with them unless they are sleeping on top of structures or in moats, depending on which habitat they are in. Even then, we watch them closely, and if we see any signs that naptime is coming to an end, we vacate the area and will not re-enter until they shift into another area or are sleeping again. Once they start shifting reliably, this phase of their care protocol will be changing to reflect the protocol used with their parents in that we will move to strictly protected contact when working with them. This should occur in coming months.
Danica W.
Swing Keeper I, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2252 on: November 20, 2017, 10:08:56 PM »

November 20, 2017
We’ve mentioned many times in the past how the leafeater biscuits we offer the giant pandas get stuck in their teeth after they eat a few in a row. Because of this, they will find a piece of bamboo to munch on to clean their teeth. Now that the cubs are eating leafeater biscuits like champs, they too have found the need to “clean their teeth.” This is great and all, unless you’re trying to shift the twins. They will search and search and search for a piece of bamboo to munch on (for five minutes or longer) after eating more than one leafeater biscuit. This all means that if we’re in a hurry, we keepers have to make sure the path the girls take to the dayroom/outdoor habitat must be free of all bamboo leaves …even that dried up week-old leaf we missed during our daily sweep. If there is a leaf in sight, they will stop and eat it before going outside!
Jen W.
Keeper III, Mammals


 bigsmile
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2253 on: November 22, 2017, 09:56:10 PM »

November 22, 2017
BIG shout-out to the Zoo’s Maintenance Team, specifically Joe, for their amazing job with red panda Idgie’s habitat renovations! Our little lady is head over paws in love with her new “hut,” and we couldn’t be any happier for her! This also couldn’t have happened at a more perfect time considering the cooler weather. Red pandas are much more lethargic during the summer months (even with her existing air-conditioned house), and cooler weather brings a much more active Idgie! Be sure to come check put her new digs!

In other news, the giant panda cubs are adorable as always. Happy Thanksgiving!
Jen W.
Keeper III, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2254 on: November 28, 2017, 03:46:07 AM »

November 27, 2017
Danica and I spent Thanksgiving with the giant pandas this year! It’s just a normal day for us and the pandas – they don’t know it’s a holiday and need the same level of care that they receive every day. The pandas feasted on several meals of bamboo, took naps, and everyone received a special treat for enrichment. Yang Yang and Lun Lun each got a “Bundt biscuit,” which is crushed-up leafeater biscuits mixed with water and frozen in a Bundt cake pan. Each “Bundt biscuit” was garnished with slices of sugarcane. We gave Ya Lun and Xi Lun each a half of a piece of sugarcane. We hope all of you enjoyed your Thanksgiving as much as we did!
Heather R.
Senior Keeper, Carnivores
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2255 on: December 02, 2017, 12:49:40 AM »

November 29, 2017
Many of you have been wondering if we have started training the cubs yet. Well, we aren’t asking for some of the more advanced behaviors that Lun Lun and Yang Yang know, but we have started on some of the smaller and easier behaviors to get the girls used to the concept of training with their care team. One of the most important behaviors many of the animals here at the Zoo know is to “shift” when asked. When we say “shift”, we mean moving an animal from one secured area to another. This behavior is important because it allows us to clean habitats safely, and if an emergency ever occurred we could move the animal quickly and reliably.

All of the training at the Zoo is positive reinforcement-based, so if the animals don’t feel like participating, that is okay and we can just try again later. Ya Lun and Xi Lun, however, have quickly learned that when they shift outside we reward them with some of their daily leafeater biscuits. They have gotten better each day at coming outside and vacuuming up their rewards in the outdoor habitat. Lun Lun has also caught on, and will usually take a quick break from her morning bamboo to see if she can sneak up a few leafeater biscuits before the girls find them.
Danica W.
Swing Keeper I, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2256 on: December 02, 2017, 12:52:09 AM »

December 1, 2017
One of our daily goals as animal care professionals is to provide enrichment for the animals. Enrichment is meant to stimulate the animal’s minds, offer the animal something new, and/or elicit natural behaviors, like foraging. Recently we offered Yang Yang and Lun Lun their produce and some leafeater biscuit powder that we mixed with a little water and froze in a Bundt cake pan. For Yang Yang, we spread all of these items in a pile of ice. Not only did Yang Yang get something new, but he also had to dig around and figure out how to retrieve his produce from the ice. He ate all of the produce first and saved the Bundt cake-shaped biscuit for last (probably because he wasn’t sure what it was!). He spent a long time eating the super-sized biscuit and he really did seem to enjoy it.
Heather R.
Senior Keeper, Carnivores
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2257 on: December 05, 2017, 02:30:53 AM »

December 4, 2017
Ya Lun and Xi Lun are eating more bamboo each day. Watching cubs grow up never gets old for me. So far, I’ve seen five of Lun Lun’s previous cubs grow into sub-adults who have all gone through the same stages of development as Ya Lun and Xi Lun have, but I still feel a sense of awe and joy at seeing these two girls eating bamboo. Both cubs are already very good bamboo-eaters and can destroy a small twig in a matter of minutes. They are learning from the best! Lun Lun is an efficient bamboo-eater and eats faster than any other panda I’ve met. Ya Lun and Xi Lun are working on keeping up with her. As a result of their voracious appetites, both are over 70 pounds now.
Heather R.
Senior Keeper, Carnivores
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2258 on: December 06, 2017, 08:46:58 PM »

December 6, 2017
If you watch PandaCam, you might have noticed that lately we have been giving Lun Lun and the cubs access to both Habitat 1 and Dayroom 1 in the mornings. The cubs are getting increasingly more comfortable with the outdoor habitat, and have even been napping in the cave and on the structure the past few days. They do, however, still very much enjoy taking naps in Dayroom 1. By giving Lun Lun and the cubs access to both areas, we give the cubs opportunity to exercise choice as to where they would like to take their morning nap. It also gives Lun Lun the opportunity to spend time outside while still keeping a close eye on the cubs if they choose to go inside. For this reason, you may not be able to see Lun Lun on the PandaCam from approximately 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. There is a behind-the-scenes transfer area at the end of the indoor hallway that connects Habitat 1 to Dayroom 1. Lun Lun has been enjoying taking her late morning nap in that area, as it allows her to keep an eye on both cubs if one chooses to be inside while the other is outside.
Danica W.
Swing Keeper I, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2259 on: December 08, 2017, 09:05:35 PM »

December 8, 2017
Ya Lun and Xi Lun have turned into little bamboo-eating machines! As mentioned in previous updates, it’s really fun to see the cubs grow and reach new milestones. They have been gnawing on and consuming some of the bamboo for quite a while now, but they are really starting to pick up the frequency at which they seek it out and eat it. As of now, they are not necessarily favoring one species over another; rather, they are seeking out the pieces that either have thin culms they can break or lots of leaves to munch on. If you’re wondering about the status of the cubs eating sweet potatoes, we will just say it’s a work in progress.
Danica W.
Swing Keeper I, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2260 on: December 12, 2017, 12:47:55 AM »

December 11, 2017
Hi panda fans! My name is Erin, and while I am new to the giant panda area, I have been a carnivore keeper here at Zoo Atlanta for the last seven years. As most of you know, the panda area is part of the Carnivore Department, and most keepers are trained to work in both the panda and meat-eating carnivore areas. Scheduling has finally opened up an opportunity for me to see how the panda side lives, and it has been quite an interesting experience. Since I have worked in my primary area for so long, I think it’s fair to say that I know the routine and animals very well. I have helped train several keepers and many interns, and it has been quite a while since I have been the one actually being trained. The routines and animals and all the little details (like species of bamboo – ugh!) are definitely different, and I have absolutely had times where I have had to have the other keepers, and even the interns, talk me through what was going on. I have enjoyed getting to spend time with the pandas and am starting to understand the routine a bit more each day. It’s been a learning experience for sure, and I look forward to spending more time with the pandas and getting the routine down.

I do have to say though that I miss those meat-eaters. If for no other reason than the fact that they poop less than pandas! And while the pandas are certainly very cute, I am still partial to Sabah, our female sun bear. I keep being told that Yang Yang will steal my heart though, so I guess time will tell…
Erin D.
Keeper II, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2261 on: December 13, 2017, 10:03:52 PM »

December 13, 2017
The cubs are acting more and more like adult giant pandas each day. They’re eating bamboo more frequently, interacting with their enrichment, and have been working on simple training behaviors. As the girls get older we are able to see their individuality and preferences show more often, too. They have really gotten into self-anointing, which is a natural behaviors panda display when they encounter an odor they enjoy. They will rub it on themselves to spread the smell all over their body. While this is a natural and important part of giant panda behavior, it is still quite comical and fun to watch. Xi Lun and Ya Lun really seem to enjoy the scents of vanilla, cinnamon and rubbing alcohol. All of these scents and liquids are pre-approved by our veterinary staff, and given in small enough quantities that would not cause harm if ingested. Today I put some rubbing alcohol near one of the cubs’ favorite toys and left it near Xi Lun. Enjoy!
Danica W.
Swing Keeper I, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2262 on: December 15, 2017, 08:30:21 PM »

December 15, 2017
I know we have all been talking about the cubs eating bamboo quite a bit lately, but it’s really the only new thing that is happening right now. They are eating more and more bamboo each day. This past week, they have started eating the culm (or the stem) of the bamboo instead of only the leaves. All panda cubs start with the leaves when they begin eating bamboo. The leaves are easier to chew and tear from the stems. The culm is tough and difficult to break. Just a few weeks ago, Ya Lun and Xi Lun struggled to eat the culm. As you can see in the photo, they were chewing on it and making teeth marks, but not quite strong enough to tear through it and consume it. However, this week, we have discovered several piles of feces from the cubs that are made up entirely of culm. You may find feces gross, but we keepers use it to monitor how much and what parts of the bamboo the pandas are consuming. Since giant pandas only process about 30 percent of what they eat, their feces looks very much like chewed-up bamboo, so it is easy for us to determine if they are primarily eating leaves or the culm.
Heather R.
Senior Keeper, Carnivores


Sorry, but I can't post the photo.  sosad

Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2263 on: December 21, 2017, 07:48:12 AM »

December 20, 2017
The animals here celebrated the holidays this past weekend with some extra-special enrichment. The adult giant pandas know what happens when they see all these surprises, so they tore in right away. The cubs, on the other hand, are a bit less experienced with this type of enrichment. They quickly explored their themed cardboard cutouts, manipulating them and tearing them apart. The boxes, which were decorated to look like presents, were a bit more perplexing. As the boxes were larger and harder to hold, the cubs quickly lost interest, choosing instead to play with the cutouts. It was only when Lun Lun came in to see what goodies they had did the cubs realize that there were treats inside. Maybe come next time, the cubs will know where all the treats are hidden and how to get them.
Shauna
Keeper II, Mammals
Logged
hermit
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Hancock County, Maine
Posts: 7,102


« Reply #2264 on: December 22, 2017, 09:26:25 PM »

December 22, 2017
Ya Lun and Xi Lun have taken quite a while to adjust to the outdoor habitat. They enjoy eating out there with Lun Lun, but are less comfortable resting outside and prefer to sleep in the dayrooms. In the last week or so, we have seen both cubs trying out different sleeping spots in the habitat. Initially, they slept in the cave for a few days, then Xi Lun chose to rest at the very back of the habitat by the rear doors. Eventually, they tried sleeping on the structure – on both levels. Ya Lun finally decided that the top of the structure was her favorite place to take a nap. Xi Lun is still not sure where her favorite napping place is outside yet. She usually waits until Ya Lun has settled into her spot to sleep, then climbs up and drapes herself on top of Ya Lun, which usually results in a wrestling match instead of sleeping.
Heather R.
Senior Keeper, Carnivores


 bigsmile
Logged
Pages:  1 ... 149 150 [151] 152   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Install Simple Machines Forum web hosting Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!