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Author Topic: New Hampshire Loons  (Read 8170 times)
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Sherri
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« on: June 05, 2016, 12:08:57 PM »

Cam link
http://www.loon.org/looncam.php#tabr3

The Nesting Pair

In 2015, this loon pair hatched and fledged one chick. The first egg was laid on May 15, so after a 28 day incubation period we expect to see a chick around June 11, if all goes well. This year, we seem to be off to an earlier start with a few loons already on nests as of May 9. The peak of nest initiation in New Hampshire usually occurs around the first week of June (see About Loon's Family and Social Life for more information). The incubation duties are shared between both loons, and you may see a nest switch if you happen to be watching at the right time. Nesting loons face many challenges, from raccoons to flooded nests, with successful hatches at fewer than 60% of all nest attempts.

Both adult loons are marked with color bands on their legs.  The female loon of this pair has been breeding here on this pond since she was originally banded in 1998.  Since the earliest known breeding age for loons is 4 years and the average age at first breeding in New Hampshire is 6 years, she is at least 22 years old, but most likely 24 years or older! She has an orange band on her left leg and blue and silver bands on her right leg. The male loon was banded for the first time in 2014.  He has red and green bands on his left leg and white and silver bands on his right leg. The bands may be visible as the loons climb on and off the nest or turn their eggs.  


The Camera Project

The live video image on this page comes from a high-definition Axis P5534E pan-tilt-zoom camera with night-time infrared illumination. Conventional power and Internet service are supplied from a nearby residence. A single video stream is fed to a distribution service, which can support hundreds of simultaneous viewers. The webcam is funded through donations to the Loon Preservation Committee's Loon Recovery Plan.  Please click here (link to http://www.loon.org/donation-form.php) to contribute to these efforts.

Acknowledgements

Funding for the loon cam project is made possible by LPC's Loon Recovery Plan.  Technical expertise and support has been provided in 2016 by Bill Gassman (www.linkedin.com/in/billgassman), bringing many improvements to the project. Thanks, Bill! Streaming services and web hosting in 2016 are provided by Brown Rice Internet.  The camera installation would not have been possible without the generous permission of an anonymous property owner.

Link to the Loon Preservation Committee
http://www.loon.org/work-of-lpc.php
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Sherri
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2016, 12:09:21 PM »

** Reserved**
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Sherri
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2016, 12:09:36 PM »

** Reserved **
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Sherri
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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2016, 12:11:20 PM »

Posted on Announcements thread on May 31, 2016

On a more cheerful note, there is a nice nh loon cam at loon.org.,click on the cam box on their main page. No night vision, and audio is kept pretty low because of neighbors, but the video is nice.  Female at least 22 years old! Hatch expected around June 11.

Midcoast......awesome --- thanks!  flower
Think we should have thread for them.

22 yrs old --- wow!!



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Sherri
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« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2016, 01:35:04 PM »

This afternoon...
3:41  Raining pretty hard



4:22  So happy (and lucky) to catch the mate here





4:26  It started to swim off



4:28   Way out in center

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midcoast maine
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2016, 10:56:50 AM »

Hi Sherry.  Great shots of them together, a sight I have yet to see! They seem to have weathered the rainstorm just fine.  They say there is a dam on the lake whose operators have been notified so that they don't let in-or is it out?-too much water.
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bonbon
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« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2016, 05:16:59 AM »

Posted yesterday on site:
Day 30
Mon, Jun 13, 2016


It’s Day 30 today and the loons are still sitting on the nest. We are watching the nest with growing concern that the single egg may not be viable. The average incubation period for loons is 28 days, but perhaps the chick needs a few extra days after the recent cold snap. Once the chick hatches it will likely spend hours afterward drying out on the nest and resting. You may see the adult loons remove the cream-colored egg membrane from the nest and drop it in the water, to keep the nest itself less visible. The chick is a tiny, black down puffball, weighing in at just over 100 grams (4 ounces) when it hatches, and gaining 40 grams (over an ounce) a day.  It can triple its weight in the first week on a steady diet of minnows, leeches, and other aquatic invertebrates.  This will be the most vulnerable time in the loon chick’s life. As they leave the nest for good a day or so after the egg hatches, the parental focus of the adult loons will shift to the brooding area, in a quiet cove on the main part of the pond, but will require just as much energy and attention as the last four weeks.
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Bonnie
midcoast maine
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« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2016, 09:55:14 AM »

Thanks for moving that here, Bonnie.  Yes, not looking good. Did you see the bit about a nearby nest which they only abandoned after 75 days, a record!  They say they will take the abandoned egg or eggs, if any, but it costs three thousand dollars PER EGG to have a lab analysis, yikes.
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midcoast maine
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2017, 11:23:22 AM »

     The loons are nesting again, after battling floods, hail, a horrific blackfly invasion, and a snapping turtle. Hatch due around June 17. I hope this one succeeds, unlike last year.
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