January 22, 2018, 03:14:05 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: 2014 - First BRI Maine Eagles egg laid March 16, 2014. Second egg laid March 19, 2014.
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages:  1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Katmai National Park & Preserve, AK  (Read 4929 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Doralyn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Gorham, Maine
Posts: 8,377



« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2015, 12:38:36 PM »

This was posted yesterday on the Blog:
Quote
Ranger Mike on the Emotion and Resiliency of Bears

Since last night viewers have tuned in to the young cub of mother bear 451 on the Katmai River Watch Cam. We don’t know much yet, but it would appear the cub stumbled and seized, and now has labored breathing, laying on the road side. Mother and sibling have intermittently joined to rest next to the cub. Katmai’s Ranger Mike Fitz has posted some words in the comments section and in a previous blog post we’d like to share with you.

“Like many of you, Ranger Jeanne, Ranger Roy and I have been watching 451 and her cubs since yesterday. We have no way of knowing at this time what is impairing the cub’s mobility.

“Instead of focusing on possible causes of injury or illness, just for a moment, I’d like to explore the idea behind emotion in animals. Many people in the chat below have commented on 451 and how she appears to be ‘grieving.’ She left the cub several times, only to return. She sits and rests patiently beside it. Is that grief, or is her behavior since yesterday more readily explained by nurturing and maternal instincts?

“Humans evolved emotions long ago, so to me it is logical to conclude that other mammals experience emotion too. After all, we are share a common ancestry. Quantifying those emotions is not really possible though. After all, how would you measure love or anger? We all know what those emotions are, but think about how difficult it is to describe them. Wild mammals, especially intelligent ones like bears, may experience emotion. Again, I think it is logical to conclude some do on some level, but we will probably never know how this affects their behavior. Parental instinct is powerful in bears, like it is in humans.”

What is the policy in these situations? Ranger Mike tells us, “National parks like Katmai protect the beauty of nature and its harsh realities. Park rangers and biologists will not intervene to help an injured animal. ‘Bears injured naturally will not be tranquilized for veterinary care’ (Katmai National Park Bear-Human Conflict Management Plan, 2006).  Injured bears will also not be euthanized unless they pose an imminent threat to human safety. ”

However, and we don’t know the specifics of 451’s cub, bears are very tough and resilient. Ranger Mike provides three great examples of injured bears who faced death but went on to live, perhaps with modifications to body or behavior.

We thank everyone for their kind words during this difficult time, and for sharing this experience with each other, as painful as it is. We, like you, hope for the best.
Logged

"...that compulsive old scribbler, the universe, jots down another day."
  - "Moose in the Morning, Northern Maine," Mona Van Duyn
Sherri
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Bethel, CT
Posts: 16,607



« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2015, 03:16:45 AM »

Thanks Doralyn  flower
Logged
Doralyn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Gorham, Maine
Posts: 8,377



« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2015, 06:01:54 PM »

Post on the River Watch Comments section about 5 pm EDT:

RangerRoy Mod  • 4 hours ago  

Join us Tuesday at 3:00pm Alaska time on the River Watch cam for a Ranger Chat with Ranger Roy and the team that collected 451's cub on Saturday, Ranger Michael, Ranger Leslie, and Ranger Bob. We'll chat briefly then open it up for your questions. If you would like to ask questions in advance, you may do so using this form: http://goo.gl/forms/BrL0wGOgnT


I have not been able to see the Mother and cub since the second cub passed and was retrieved by the team.  Both yesterday and today there have been other Mother bears and cubs in the water and on the land or strip of land out in the water, but they do not look like the family that lost the cub/sibling.

9:05 pm   At this time there is a lighter/frosty coated Mother on the land strip out in the water with a smaller dark cub and they are very playful, both in the water, running and chasing Mom, and right now pestering and rolling around with Mom, and Mom is playful right back.
Logged

"...that compulsive old scribbler, the universe, jots down another day."
  - "Moose in the Morning, Northern Maine," Mona Van Duyn
JudyB
Administrator
*
Offline Offline

Location: Midcoast Maine
Posts: 7,937



WWW
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2015, 06:50:35 PM »

Thanks, Doralyn - not sure if I'll be able to watch tomorrow (and I'm thinking it will be 11 am eastern time?) - but am glad they will be letting people know.

And big hugs to you, Sherri, Bonnie, Patti and others who watch this cam.  flower
Logged

Doralyn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Gorham, Maine
Posts: 8,377



« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2015, 07:09:21 PM »

Thanks JudyB. I may be able to watch tomorrow.  I'll try.

Here is another post to the Blog in the last 20 minutes, and it includes video from the days of the loss and of the recovery, etc.

Quote from: Lee from the Outer Richmond
I put together a rather lengthy video from Saturday after the cub died --
Part I -- begins Saturday morning where 451 and her living cub are keeping vigil until they leave to go fishing,

Part II The three National Park Service rangers arrive by boat to retrieve the cub so that they can have a necropsy performed on the animal to understand what caused its demise.

Part III 451 returns with the cub and discovers the body gone, but stays in the area for quite awhile and then finally traces the dead cub's scent to the exact location where the rangers loaded the dead cub onto a boat to carry it away.

It's 1:45 hours long -- but the day was so poignant -- for those who missed it, it's worth a view.

Katmai National Park: brown bear mother grieving the passing of her cub
Lee Block
Published on Oct 26, 2015

On October 23rd, captured on the Explore.org live webcams, a Katmai National Park spring brown bear cup died after collapsing on October 21st from unknown causes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZGe_kP3AwQ
Logged

"...that compulsive old scribbler, the universe, jots down another day."
  - "Moose in the Morning, Northern Maine," Mona Van Duyn
bonbon
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,691


« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2015, 03:56:31 AM »

Thanks for the update, Sherri.
This was posted by one of the chatters on explore.org.  
Enjoy!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hveP5ef9A0Q

I posted this a few days ago - I'm 99% certain that it is NOT 451 and her remaining cub; it's another Mom with her cub - named "Velcro."  It's only a few minutes long, and absolutely delightful!  If you have a few minutes, take a look!  You'll see why 'they' call the little one 'Velcro!'

Will try (to remember!) to watch the Katmai chat today.  Should be interesting.
Logged

Bonnie
Doralyn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Gorham, Maine
Posts: 8,377



« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2015, 08:28:49 AM »

One of the viewers/chat participants posted the time conversion for all US time zones:

3PM Alaska is
7PM Eastern
6PM Central
5PM Mountain
4PM Pacific
Logged

"...that compulsive old scribbler, the universe, jots down another day."
  - "Moose in the Morning, Northern Maine," Mona Van Duyn
JudyB
Administrator
*
Offline Offline

Location: Midcoast Maine
Posts: 7,937



WWW
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2015, 01:26:54 PM »

Thanks, Doralyn - I think I double-corrected or something as I normally spend half my time posting about west coast nests in pacific time - and for that I subtract three.

Still not sure if I'll be able to watch - but we'll see.  bigsmile
Logged

Doralyn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Gorham, Maine
Posts: 8,377



« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2015, 05:44:12 PM »

7 pm - 8:06 pm EDT: Riverwatch Ranger Chat with Ranger Roy

(Note:  I watched the whole thing, missing the opening remarks because I had trouble with my sound, but I got it working just in time to get the introductions (below) and promptly went to hand writing notes (three pages). I also skimmed the hundreds of comments on the chat for things I missed.  I will consolidate and rework them and add them here to this post.)

The chat team included Ranger Roy Wood, Chief of Interpretation, and the three Rangers with special wildlife biological training who collected the cub:  Michael Thaxton, Bob Peterson, the pilot, who kept watch out for the Mother Bear, and Leslie Skora.

On the public's talk about the time spent with the deceased cub: it was surprising to many to see the mother with the cub for so long, but that behavior was not surprising to the rangers. However, having other bears walking by and not stopping or seeing it as food possibility was interesting.

Retrival was done more for what might be learned that is unknown about threats to other bears, humans, or the unknown. They quickly determined to do a necropsy and sought out where that might be done, calling first to the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, WI, where they knew of a good program and where they had previously sent birds.  They were interested in doing the necropsy, so the Rangers made the arrangements and got to the area to get the cub as quickly as they could.  The goal: get the cub to the lab as soon as possible to learn as much as they can from this loss.

Once there, they saw that once the Mother and cub left, "the birds were already there...scavengers" they wanted to get the cub picked up quickly.  

The three Rangers deliberately went without guns (they would not put themselves into a situation where they would have to kill the sow to retrieve the cub), but they did carry bear spray for protection. They also wore surgical gloves for their own protection (standard practice). They were glad that the Mom and cub had gone off and seemed not to be concerned with the boat or staying close enough to see the people.  Ranger Michael said he could see them and that they seemed oblivious to what was happening, not really looking back to that area. "She didn't look over...moving upriver looking for fish..."

They worked quickly to get the pictures and to pick up the cub and get it to the boat.  I mentioned the bag in my report previously, but the reason they did not use it was that chilling the tissue was important, and the air flow would do that.  Once they got it tagged and packed in ice, they were off to the airport.  They didn't even determine the gender.  That was not a concern for then, time was of the essence.  Later they let the WI folks know, and they will email the gender when they know.

Ranger Roy had some pictures to share that Leslie took of the cub at the site.  From those they observed:
-some hair was pulled out and on the ground
-there were no signs of trama
-"looks clean", no blood, perhaps fecal matter as expected after 3 days with loss of muscle/control
-"some" small amount of foam on underside of the mouth
-muscle tone good
-no external injuries
-weighed about 60 lbs (1 lb when born, now about 9 to 10 months old) "...was a plump cub...they eat well here..."

The three did all the walking around where these bears were known to have been just to see if there was anything obvious that might help them find out what might have happened to this cub.  Nothing was found to give any clues.

They talked a little bit about the sow.  She has had a limp since 2013.  She went elsewhere that year after she was seen with the limp, and didn't frequent areas where people were.  This year she came down to the platform and seemed ok, but there is a limp perceptible still. Look for her tip-toeing. And report it if you see her.

This year is her first documented litter, but they don't know if it is her first.

If there were foul play, they couldn't share it because of criminality.  Also can't speculate, so must wait.  

The necropsy was being done today, so by the end of the week, or maybe Monday, there will be some results -- just basic information (called "gross necropsy").  Details will come later. Lab tests, time to grow samples of toxins, bacteria, or viruses, will take time to do and evaluate.  

This was a 60 pound cub and it would take a large amount of some things to sicken it.  They mentioned things like parvo virus, rabies, and distemper, but these have not been found in bears in Alaska.  (Have seen in Europe.)  Salmon have tapeworm, but it's different from that found in meat, and "highly unlikely to cause death in a  bear."  Antifreeze that might kill a dog, probably not kill a bear, and they mentioned that they use propolene-glycol and that being very unlikely.

On a lighter note, they joked about how much chocolate people send them (which they all love) but all agreed that if people wanted to send them something, send them money to do DNA tests (costs $50 to $100/sample) to test all the bears at Brooks Camp for possibility of inbreeding!!  There's speculation that there may be some because of all the bears that keep coming there, but there's little reason to suspect that it occurs. (A limited study in 2005-08 yeilded not enough to know if there is an inbreed population. Yet, the topic comes up!)

This was a great discussion and these people are terriffic.
Logged

"...that compulsive old scribbler, the universe, jots down another day."
  - "Moose in the Morning, Northern Maine," Mona Van Duyn
JudyB
Administrator
*
Offline Offline

Location: Midcoast Maine
Posts: 7,937



WWW
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2015, 06:05:45 PM »

Thanks, Doralyn!  I found a link to a video on YouTube, and am watching that - and I haven't been watching, and am looking forward to seeing your thoughts.
Logged

Sherri
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Bethel, CT
Posts: 16,607



« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2015, 06:59:05 AM »

Thanks Doralyn.....
I also watched the whole chat 'live' last night.....there wasn't any new information but it was extremely interesting
to hear their perspectives -- both on the loss of this cub and their experience.  Mike seemed to be the one with
the most 'field' experience -- or perhaps it was because he was doing the most talking and responding to questions.
The event that sticks in mind though, is the other bears passing by the cub and not doing harm.  Humanizing or not, I believe they were paying respects.  Who's to say what goes on in the minds of our wildlife?  

I went back and watched the long video that was posted the other day....... I was glad to be able to see that as it
showed the moments that I missed when the cub and Mama returned to discover the cub was gone.  Below are pictures from that scenario which leads up to my post #11, that I watched 'live'.

Here are caps taken from the video showing when Mama 451 and cub first discovered the little one had passed.    I must have missed it by minutes when watching ‘live’ as it is just before my slideshow in Post #11.

They return – the cub first



Mom right behind him



Mom starts checking the area  sosad





After a few minutes, she starts to head across the road


Logged
Sherri
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Bethel, CT
Posts: 16,607



« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2015, 06:59:52 AM »

(continued)

The cub follows







Mom kept sniffing the air – presumably picking up the scent of her cub




Logged
Sherri
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Bethel, CT
Posts: 16,607



« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2015, 07:02:45 AM »

(continued)



………they go back across road (which brings you to my previous post of where they eventually go up the road and rest where the cub was picked up by the rangers to go on the boat)


   

After this cap, the rest of the events are captured in my previous slideshow in Post #11



Note: This is a photo that was shown last night. It was taken when the rangers stopped with the cub.  I’m posting it to show that it is the location where Mama and cub rested at their last scent of the cub.



Here is a picture of the team that held the chat last night
L-R   Ranger Leslie, Ranger Bob, Ranger Mike and Ranger Roy doing the moderating


Click for slideshow of Mom and Cub returning
http://s121.photobucket.com/user/Sherd43/slideshow/Bear%20-%20McNeil%20River/10-24-15%20Slideshow%201?sort=9

This is a repost of the previous slideshow that picks up where the above SS leaves off (Post #11)
Click for slideshow
http://s121.photobucket.com/user/Sherd43/slideshow/Bear%20-%20McNeil%20River/10-24-15%20Slideshow?sort=9

Looking forward to, as is everyone, what the results of the necropsy are.  Based on the rangers preliminary exam, it
doesn't appear to be trauma -- unless internal.  When I was watching live, shortly before the wee one passed, it
had a seizure -- if I had to guess, I'd think the cause was something neurological.  Of course that doesn't explain what happened to 451's third cub.   Praying it isn't disease that it communicable to the rest of the population.

Reflecting on such a very sad situation, I'm still glad that I happened on it at just the right time as I was able to
bring it to the attention of the rest of you.  

My posts and slideshows are my way of tribute to this beautiful bear family as I don't do videos.
Rest in peace, wee one.....and to Mama 451 and cub, move on to live a wonderful life. love love
Logged
Doralyn
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Gorham, Maine
Posts: 8,377



« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2015, 08:28:17 AM »

Thank you for all your work on this event, Sherri. 
Logged

"...that compulsive old scribbler, the universe, jots down another day."
  - "Moose in the Morning, Northern Maine," Mona Van Duyn
bonbon
Member
*
Offline Offline

Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,691


« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2015, 09:05:33 AM »

Quote Sherri:  "Reflecting on such a very sad situation, I'm still glad that I happened on it at just the right time as I was able to
bring it to the attention of the rest of you." 

I'm so glad you brought all of this to our attention, Sherri - (as mentioned before, I accidently learned of it while reading the Hog Island chat - the chatters were  devastated also by the loss of the cub).
Thanks for all of your pictures, recaps, and info.   
And Doralyn, thanks for your review of the chat.
 
Logged

Bonnie
Pages:  1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Install Simple Machines Forum web hosting Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!