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News: 2014 - First BRI Maine Eagles egg laid March 16, 2014. Second egg laid March 19, 2014.
 
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Author Topic: NCTC Nest Observations, ScreenShots & Videos  (Read 373612 times)
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Sherri
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« Reply #2745 on: February 01, 2017, 07:53:15 AM »

Thanks Ferenz  flower ...... looking forward to this season
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Sherri
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« Reply #2746 on: February 11, 2017, 07:14:37 AM »

9:10 AM
Nest looks ready  love

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kittenface
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« Reply #2747 on: February 17, 2017, 04:50:35 PM »

Sometime in the last 2 hours first egg. I forgot how to post picture. blush2
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PattiO
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« Reply #2748 on: February 17, 2017, 04:52:36 PM »

Thanks kitten!  When I checked this afternoon there was no one home!

(You have to copy the link from photobucket, or wherever to post a pic).
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Sherri
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« Reply #2749 on: February 18, 2017, 05:36:24 PM »

What wonderful news!  I was beginning to think they might skip this year!  lollol (just kidding).
I haven't been able to check on nests the last couple days but so much appreciate Patti and her updates!  flower

kittenface, how nice to 'see' you again!  bigsmile
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Sherri
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« Reply #2750 on: February 25, 2017, 11:04:54 AM »

Shep had a pretty intense encounter with a juvie this morning.........
Here is video done by WVEagles Terri (thank you!  flower) ..... she refers to Shep as "Ben"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1cyLssSyCk

I made a couple stills from the video......
Up he goes after the juvie -- hope he didn't do damage to the eggs when he came down



......... and here you can clearly see it was a juvie



........on a side note, I have not been able to get live streaming for days.  Anyone else having issues?

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PattiO
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« Reply #2751 on: February 25, 2017, 05:59:49 PM »

I think that little bugger was sitting up above him the whole time.  Doesn't seem any damage was done to the eggs.

PS - I never have any trouble getting the cam Sherri.  I use the link on page one and I use FF. 
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PattiO
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« Reply #2752 on: March 01, 2017, 10:40:23 PM »

Some video from today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95O7v70Q2xQ
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PattiO
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« Reply #2753 on: April 06, 2017, 07:45:31 PM »

I never even got around to posting any pictures of the little ones. Sad

Update from NCTC's FB page....

Here is a more detailed look at the happenings at the eagle nest the past couple of weeks:


Due to unknown circumstances, the second of the two eaglets born this year expired early April 1st. The loss of two eaglets (3/27 & 4/1) is a rare experience at this nest; complete nest failures are not regular occurrences. The 2ndhatchling, born Tues. March 28th, appeared to be sound; moving within the nest bowl and taking food from the parents within one day of hatching. Food was continuously provided over the next three days, and both adults took turns brooding the chick.

Biologists do not know what affected the recently hatched chicks, but possibilities include weather or disease. Weather-related factors such as heavy rainfall during the nesting period can influence the nesting success of birds including raptors. Studies show that inclement weather can drive avian parents to increase their energy outputs and time hunting. Heavy, consistent rainfall may have factored into the male's time away from the nest due to increases in time hunting food and the female’s need to mantle the eaglet to maintain optimal body temperatures. While such weather is not atypical for birds, these components along with any present biological challenges may lead to nest failure (McDonald et al. 2004). On Friday, March 31st, the amount of rain was significant, resulting in 0.8 inches of rain!

Microbes can be components of nests, egg laying, and hatching events. The last blog post (March 16, 2017) began a discussion of possible biological reasons for the death of the first hatchling. Research in trans-shell microbes (Cook et al. 2003) indicates that the probability of infections is high. They have shown that incubation temperatures, timing, green nesting material, and weather conditions play a role in limiting infections across the shell and inside eggs. We may never know if an infection impacted our eggs, but this is another factor in the nesting success equation.

Questions remain about the possibility of a second clutch. According to biologists at NCTC, the possibility of a second clutch is low. If they attempt another clutch, timing, weather, and food matches may pose new challenges for the pair. The amount of energy, stored fat is required to lay new eggs, and impending hot weather are major issues. Bald eagles lay and hatch before the steady summer weather arrives since they can only obtain moisture from the food they consume.

The NCTC EagleCam offers us a unique perspective: a ‘sneak peek” into the living room of an apex predator during a crucial time in its life cycle. Although this nesting season may not continue as expected and action in the nest may decline, we plan to keep the EagleCam up and running until mid-June or early July keeping an eye out for the adults who occasionally return to the nest.

We thank everyone who watch the live feed, reads the updates and corresponds with our team. We also send a special note of thanks to Terri Bayles, Debi Chiappini, Deb Stecyk, and Doreen Wermer who were integral to our 2016 research initiative to quantify prey deliveries to the nest. They along with so many others are essential to our mission and help us to maintain a watchful eye on the health and progress of this incredible species.

Thanks also to Outdoor Channel, the Friends of the NCTC, Hancock Wildlife Foundation, FWS eagle biologist Craig Koppie, NCTC staff, Lois Johnson-Mead, Clayton McBride, Rob Ball, and all of the long time followers of the cam.
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