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News: 2014 - First BRI Maine Eagles egg laid March 16, 2014. Second egg laid March 19, 2014.
 
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Author Topic: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge  (Read 136127 times)
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JudyB
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« Reply #645 on: February 26, 2015, 01:01:53 PM »

We think her mate is a first-time male, Sherri - and as far as I know, we don't know if the female is experienced or not, though some on chat thought she didn't look like the female from their productive years.

I believe he did some incubation initially - I was watching on the Hancock forum around the time the eggs were laid - but recently I've seen him come in and guard the nest while she takes a break, but haven't seen him do any incubating (though I haven't watched a lot - it's already a tough year, and I don't want to get too hooked on another high-risk nest  love ).  It's likely they also have intruder concerns - there are apparently a lot of eagles in the area.

We don't have a lot of posts on the Hancock forum - arrival of the first egg starts here - http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?topic=737001#737001
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PattiO
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« Reply #646 on: February 26, 2015, 01:24:48 PM »

Kind of sounds like the same thing that's happening at E4K. 
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bonbon
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« Reply #647 on: February 26, 2015, 01:37:16 PM »

Hi all,
Someone on Blair's nest just mentioned... and it's true... that maybe this happens all the time and we haven't seen this or been aware of it; now that there are so many cams available (usually installed on established nests) we may see more single moms and/or dads who are new and learning.

(So true, JudyB.  "High-risk nests" sure are tough.   It's so hard not to get attached (and it's hard for me humanizing their behavior)).
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Bonnie
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« Reply #648 on: February 26, 2015, 02:04:14 PM »

Thanks Judy.....such a shame.  sosad  
I haven't watched this nest or checked on it at all this year so I had no idea.
Bonnie, Blair is where I saw it mentioned, and it was a trustworthy source, which prompted me to ask.  bigsmile
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Sherri
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« Reply #649 on: February 26, 2015, 02:17:14 PM »

4:16  Adult on the nest incubating
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bonbon
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« Reply #650 on: February 26, 2015, 05:41:07 PM »

18:36 - Adult on the nest incubating, looking around.

(So true, Sherri.  Blair's chat is great; super information and no condescension  whistle .  And the tabs at the top of the page have great info)
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Bonnie
PattiO
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« Reply #651 on: February 26, 2015, 09:40:25 PM »

I don't think it's that we've just never seen it happen before the cams.  This is my ninth year watching and this type of thing has only started happening on cam.  What I think is the cause is the fact that the Eagle population is growing by leaps and bounds every year.  Pennsylvania alone will probably reach 300 nesting pairs very soon.... we're already over 200.  If one eaglet survives 5 years from only half of those nests (100) that's 330 more eagles.  It's going to be a big fight for territory and mates.
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bonbon
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« Reply #652 on: February 27, 2015, 06:29:32 AM »

Thanks, Patti! love
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Bonnie
Sherri
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« Reply #653 on: February 27, 2015, 07:29:37 AM »

Patti, for sure .....kind of bittersweet, isn't it.  nod2 nod2

......(So true, Sherri.  Blair's chat is great; super information and no condescension  whistle .  And the tabs at the top of the page have great info)

Just to clarify, I wasn't talking about the Blair chat as a whole.......I meant the individual person who mentioned it.  She is one of the regulars on the Maine nest. bigsmile  ...... though they do provide some good documented information.
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PattiO
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« Reply #654 on: March 01, 2015, 12:13:17 PM »

Checking in to find 2 eggs alone on an icey/snowy nest.   sigh2
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JudyB
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« Reply #655 on: March 21, 2015, 08:46:26 AM »

Sad news from Sequoyah, I'm afraid.

I'm not really sure if the male was replaced after the eggs were laid, or if he somehow got distracted (there were intruder issues, I think) and got out of the incubation phase - but whatever the reason, he was incubating the eggs initially - and then stopped, and the female alone incubated since at least late February (I started paying closer attention February 22, and I don't think anyone saw the male incubate after that).  The female needed to leave to get food and stretch her wings, so the eggs were left alone, sometimes in quite cold weather (looking back on the Hancock forum, there was once where it was over two hours with the temperature near freezing, and they were left alone for 15-20 or more minutes several times when it was cold enough that there was snow around the dry little nest cup).

In spite of being left alone quite a lot, the first egg actually began hatching on Tuesday or Wednesday (Wednesday, March 18, would have been Day 39), though there was not a successful hatch.  Some observers thought movement stopped the morning of Wednesday the 18th, though others weren't sure - but either way, the male removed the partially hatched egg from the nest bowl and out of sight of the cam, so we don't know if he ate it or dropped it over the side. 

(Video of the removal of the egg - not graphic - https://youtu.be/nAFGWSUDFCU - having some computer issues so can't open the page to get the credit for the person who made the video - will add soon.)

The second egg may have shown some signs of hatching (some thought they saw the egg move independently, and maybe a pip), but the female incubated it for a while after the first egg was removed, and then she left and hasn't been back.  (And I don't remember if she left later on the 18th, or on the morning of the 19th - need to see if I can find somewhere other than chat that follows the cam to check.)

The male was back briefly on the 20th, looked at the egg, moved it a bit, kicked some straw on it, then left.  I haven't seen either of them since them (though I'm not watching full time).

Sutton Center Director of Conservation Dr. Steve Sherrod posted his thoughts here (scroll down to March 19, 2015) - http://www.suttoncenter.org/pages/live_eagle_camera.  Here's what he said:

Here are some thoughts about the incident from Sutton Center Director of Conservation Dr. Steve Sherrod:

Yesterday, March 18, was one of perplexing behavior by the eagles nesting at SNWR. Accounts captured on the cameras and witnessed by video observers show visible, independent movement in one or both eggs, with an apparent yellow blob beyond the top of one egg in the nest. The female that was incubating became upset, was vocalizing, left the nest, and returned with the male. At least one of the eggs appeared misshapen at that time, as if either hatching or partially broken. One of the adults then appears to pick up the misshapen egg in its beak and drop the egg over the edge of the nest. Incubation of the single egg left in the nest then continued, but today, March 19, the remaining egg has appeared unattended for over 6 hours at the time of this writing and will likely no longer be viable.

I have studied and maintained raptors for much of my life and have either hatched in captivity or have overseen captive hatching of nearly 300 bald eagle eggs and many more hundreds of peregrine, gyrfalcon, and prairie falcon eggs.  Unfortunately, I cannot say with absolute confidence just exactly what happened yesterday with this bald eagle pair, but I have a reasonable idea.  It is likely that at least one if not both 2014-2015 Sequoyah bald eagle eggs were hatching with almost completely developed chicks in the process of turning or rotating within and breaking out of the shell(s).  Both captive breeding and wild breeding peregrine falcon adults have been observed, in rare cases, to pick at hatching eggs with their beaks, sometimes appearing to “assist” the young out of the egg shells. Usually, no “help” for the hatching chicks is exhibited or needed. On very rare occasions, adult falcons have been observed to continue picking at the cracked shells and actually into the hatching chicks, so that the latter are either killed or eaten by the adult. Older (about 2 week) peregrine chicks have been consumed by adult falcons in very rare instances as captured by nest cameras.

During the hatching process the chicks often, although not always, vocalize. A chick that is having trouble completing the rotational turn during hatching or in freeing itself from the shell halves can vocally protest rigorously.  Also, a hatching chick that is sickly can remain inside, weak, and silently pass, or can protest vocally while continuing to struggle.  This is especially true when the chick has a yolk sac infection, often resulting from bacteria invaded through pores in the egg shell.  Such infections are usually fatal for the chick. Adults might react to the complaining chick by trying to brood it, feed it, or by eventually killing it, sometimes feeding the deceased chick to the other chicks in the nest or sometimes discarding the individual out of the nest. Such behavior might function to actually spread the infection or might serve as conservation of energy for the family group.  If the second Sequoyah bald eagle egg ends up deserted, it could possibly be infected as well. We do know that when eggs are warm from incubation, and an adult must get off the eggs to eat or otherwise departs during a rain storm, the cold rain on top of dirty, but warm eggs, facilitates invasion by bacteria on the shell. (For that reason, we always clean eggs in captivity with a warmer solution than the temperature of the incubated egg).  Without tests for disease in the deceased eggs/chicks, or without ability to hear chick vocalizations we can only speculate about what might have happened in this instance at Sequoyah, but the preceding scenario is likely.


Rest in peace, little almost-chicks - and I'm keeping my fingers crossed for a much better season next year.
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PattiO
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« Reply #656 on: November 21, 2015, 11:32:58 PM »

Cam link on page 1 has been updated for 2015/16
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PattiO
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« Reply #657 on: February 03, 2017, 07:42:25 AM »

The eagle nest cameras have failed after years in Oklahoma’s weather extremes. We are exploring options for replacing them in time for the 2016-2017 nesting season. In the meantime, please click to enjoy this collection of “greatest hits” images.

Feed from Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge near Vian, Oklahoma

    not available

Feed from Sooner Lake north of Stillwater, Oklahoma

    not available
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Sherri
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« Reply #658 on: February 03, 2017, 07:49:29 AM »

The eagle nest cameras have failed after years in Oklahoma’s weather extremes. We are exploring options for replacing them in time for the 2016-2017 nesting season. In the meantime, please click to enjoy this collection of “greatest hits” images.

Feed from Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge near Vian, Oklahoma

    not available

Feed from Sooner Lake north of Stillwater, Oklahoma

    not available

Thanks for bringing the info here, Patti.  I hope they will be able to get replacement camers.
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PattiO
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« Reply #659 on: February 03, 2017, 10:56:46 AM »

No sooner do I report that news .... then this shows up on my FB page today!!! Smiley  

Good things come to those who wait! Our Bald Eagle nest camera at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge is now up and running! Watch it at http://www.suttoncenter.org/live-bald-eagle-nest-camera/. This pair of eagles is currently incubating two eggs! If using a mobile device, look for the mobile link below the video window.]

http://www.suttoncenter.org/live-bald-eagle-nest-camera/
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